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Prevalence of refractive error at rural junior high students In Badung District

Ni Made Ari Suryathi , Ni Made Laksmi Utari, Ariestanti Tri Handayani, Ari Andayani, I Wayan Eka Sutyawan, I Wayan Gede Jayanegara

Ni Made Ari Suryathi
Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Email: arisuryathi@gmail.com

Ni Made Laksmi Utari
Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar

Ariestanti Tri Handayani
Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar

Ari Andayani
Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar

I Wayan Eka Sutyawan
Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar

I Wayan Gede Jayanegara
Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar
Online First: January 25, 2020 | Cite this Article
Suryathi, N., Utari, N., Handayani, A., Andayani, A., Sutyawan, I., Jayanegara, I. 2020. Prevalence of refractive error at rural junior high students In Badung District. Bali Journal of Ophthalmology 3(2): 21-24. DOI:10.15562/bjo.v3i1.40


Introduction and Purpose: Refractive error is common in school age children. The prevalence of refractive error is 23-25% at 12-15 years of age. Refractive error is related with increasing of close range activities, use of gadgets, reading habits, and minimal outdoor activities.

Method: This research is a cross-sectional descriptive study to determine the characteristics of refractive error that occur in junior high school students in rural areas in Badung Regency. The data obtained can be a reference for community eye health services and as a basis for increasing outdoor activities for school age children. Result: Junior High School I, II, IV Petang is a junior high school

located in a rural area in Badung Regency. Two hundred twenty- two Petang I, II, IV Junior High School students was examined anterior and posterior segment of eyeball and found the prevalence of refractive error is was 13.96%, which 6.3% myopia, 1.8% myopia astigmat simplex (MAS), 3.15% myopia astigmat compositum (MAC), and 2.71% myopia and amblyopia. Seventy-seven percent of students who use glasses have optimal vision after using glasses (visual impairment).

Conclusion: Rural areas, adequate outdoor activities, minimum close range activities are factors that can reduce the prevalence of refractive error in school aged children.

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